Searching for work opened my eyes to an area of user experience I’d never thought much about before: the online experience of finding and applying for jobs.

While searching one day, I found two jobs at XYZ Company* which looked like good opportunities. So I clicked the career link on their web site to apply.

XYZ Company’s job application process invites applicants to create a profile which hiring managers can view in connection with their job application. The profile is essentially a résumé, including contact information and work experience. Because I’d applied for a different job previously, my profile was there but outdated.

So I started by updating my profile. That’s when things got interesting. I’d made a few changes, and then noticed that there was a button to attach a LinkedIn profile. Had I done that before? I didn’t remember for sure, and there was no indication on the page as to whether the LinkedIn profile was actually attached. So I clicked the button just to be safe. When I finished attaching (or reattaching?) my LinkedIn profile and returned to my profile page, all my recent changes had been lost.

After retyping my changes, I reviewed the work experience section. A recent job was missing, but the only place to add it was at the end of the work experience list, which put it out of order (work experience was listed most recent first). There was no way to reorder the items, so my two choices were to put the job out of order, or insert a blank job entry at the bottom, and then copy and paste everything down one item so I could insert the latest job at the top. Because I wanted my profile to be accurate and well-organized I opted for the latter, which took considerable time and required double-checking to make sure I hadn’t made errors as I laboriously copied and pasted several dozen fields.

The next task was to update the cover letter, which oddly was part of the profile. My old one was there, but it wasn’t relevant to my new job. But then I realized I could only have one cover letter, and I was considering applying for two jobs. There was no option but to write a generic cover letter, which was definitely not ideal.

The final usability glitch was that the button at the bottom of the profile screen was labeled Submit. Did it mean I was submitting the application for a certain job, or just saving my changes? It wasn’t clear, and I never got the chance to find out. After spending several hours wrestling with the online form, I returned to the job listings and found that between the time I started the online application and the time I checked, the job had been removed from the list of open positions.

Did usability issues make a difference here? Well, possibly XYZ Company missed out on an employee who would have been a perfect fit for their job. I definitely lost out on the opportunity to apply. Usability made the difference here, where minutes counted.

*The names of the guilty have been changed to protect possible future job opportunities.