We who work in user experience typically want to delight our users. However, doing so can be challenging: not only is our user base typically diverse, but our users’ needs and preferences change over time. They become more familiar with our product or system, and even with technology in general. In addition, their devices are often quite diverse as well.

Well, with a little creativity and a lot of user understanding, we can delight more of them more often. What’s the key? We could call it “user-optimizable design”: giving users some key choices to allow them to customize their experience in a way that’s best for them.

Here are a few of my favorites.

My Life Organized: Compact vs. Standard View

I love white space sometimes, but not on my to do list. I’d rather see more of my items at a time so I can plan appropriately. That’s why I love the way my favorite life management application, My Life Organized, gives a me choice of standard and compact view. Sounds simple, but it’s a big deal for me because the compact view makes my user experience so much better.

Compact View
Standard View

Gmail’s Reply-to Function

Frequently I bring up an email I’ve sent and reply to it when I need to send additional information to the original recipient (probably because I forgot something in the first email!). When I do this, virtually every email client puts my email address in the To box, which is almost never what I want. Why would I bring up an email I’ve just sent, and re-send it to myself at the same email address?

To my surprise and delight, I discovered that gmail knows what I really want to do. Even when I reply to an email I’ve sent, it places the original recipient’s address in the To box instead of mine. Every time I use that feature, I’m grateful a company took the time to understand its users.

Choice of Tips at Startup

Some applications, such as Techsmith’s Snagit Editor, allow users to choose whether to see a productivity tip each time they start the application. Techsmith understands that users may appreciate a helping hand at one point, but later get to the stage where they don’t need it.

Keyboard Shortcuts

Not everyone cares to use keyboard shortcuts, but for those who type a lot, they’re a major time-saver. Adobe Dreamweaver and Corel WordPerfect allow users to customize their keyboard shortcuts so they make the most sense fo the user. As a bonus, WordPerfect allows users to choose whether to display keyboard shortcuts on menus.

Ancestry’s Suggested Records

Anyone sleuthing for information on an ancestor likely wants to know about any and every record that exists. In a stroke of genius, Ancestry.com added a Suggested Records panel on the screen that shows information on a single record. Based on the user’s search parameters, Suggested Records shows records that are probably for the same person. Sure, not all the records turn out to be relevant, but the bulk of them are, which saves time and alerts researchers to records they may not have known existed.

Of course, user-optimizable design can be carried too far. Too many options for customization can be confusing and actually reduce usability. But if we understand our users well enough, we can provide them with some key customization options that will give them a better user experience.