Recently I borrowed a DVD from the library. After watching the previews, I started the movie. But partway through I had to turn it off and take care of some other tasks.

Later, when I was able to watch the movie again, I tried to start where I left off—but I couldn’t. Navigation was disabled and I was forced to go through the previews again. This happened several times.

So did I gladly watch the previews over and over again each time I put the DVD in? No, I either muted the sound or turned my attention to other things. Finally I discovered I could at least fast forward through them.

I found myself wondering about the motivations of the company who configured the DVD to make viewers watch the previews each time the DVD was started. They seemed to think that if they didn’t force us to watch them, we wouldn’t. (That in itself says something about their confidence in the appeal of the previews!) But what if I’d already seen them? What if I were in a hurry? What if the movies being previewed didn’t interest me?

Did they think that forcing me to watch the previews would sell more DVDs? The truth was, it made me not want to buy the DVD I’d borrowed or the ones being advertised! They thought they could make viewers watch the previews, but their plan backfired and left me with a poor user experience.

Whenever possible, designers should give users a choice instead of forcing a given configuration on them. Obviously, there may be times when offering users a choice is not feasible. In that case, it’s crucial for designers to understand users, not make assumptions that end up frustrating them.