Usable design is both about solving and preventing problems. You might think it would go without saying that we want to be solving the right problems. But it’s not always as easy as it sounds.

Some time ago I worked at a place where the intranet search had a poor reputation. Results were all over the place, often with little or no apparent relevance to the search terms entered. I’d estimate that close to 50% of the time I couldn’t find what I was searching for, even though I knew it existed and that the specific search terms I’d used appeared on the page. Eventually I’d find the page by digging up an old email with the link or asking another employee.

Employees complained about the search, and the intranet engineers acknowledged the problem. Then one day I was surprised to hear one of the engineers talk about the need to make the search “fuzzier,” presumably so it would return more results. I remember thinking to myself, I don’t search to be fuzzier; I need it to be more focused! In other words, the problem wasn’t that I was getting too few results; I was getting the wrong results.

Here’s another example. One of my favorite sites beta-tested an elegant and powerful search form. It was in a narrow banner at the top of the page, and it offered flexible options that made it simple to run a complex search. Not only that, the search form stayed unobtrusive but visible as I continued to refine my results. I never had better search results than with that interface.

Then, for reasons that puzzle me to this day, the user-friendly beta design was scrapped and a less user-friendly one rolled into production. The new design dropped some of the most useful features of the beta; in addition, the search form was moved to a panel on the left of the screen. Even with some of the most useful features removed, the search panel was so long that it went “below the fold” on many monitors, making it necessary to scroll down to see the Search button. And because it was necessary to scroll down to initiate the search, results were loaded into the scrolled-down page so users had to manually scroll up to the top of the results.

Users complained about the new design, and soon an “improvement” was put in place: When the user clicked the Search button, the web page auto-scrolled to the top of the page.

Once again, the problem had been misdiagnosed. Having to scroll up after searching was only a symptom of deeper problems with the new interface.

In her thought-provoking blog post How Reframing a Problem Unlocks Innovation, Tina Seelig shares a quote attributed to Albert Einstein:

If I had an hour to solve a problem and my life depended on the solution, I would spend the first fifty-five minutes determining the proper question to ask, for once I know the proper question, I could solve the problem in less than five minutes.

Realizing there is a problem is a great first step, but it’s not enough. We need to be sure we’re not chopping down trees in the proverbial “wrong forest.” We’ve got to identify the problem correctly before we can solve it. How to do that is a subject for another blog post.