If you visited my blog over the last few days, you probably noticed it was down for a while. There’s a usability story behind that.

Last Monday I spent about four hours on a blog post, complete with complementary screen shots. I posted it and all was well, until I noticed that I needed to make a slight edit. I tried to log back in to make the changes, but I couldn’t. I kept getting this error message:

Now as much as I’d love to think that millions of people find value in my blog and were hitting it all at once, that seemed pretty unlikely. So I tried a number of typical troubleshooting strategies, all to no avail. Finally, because the problems started shortly after I upgraded my version of WordPress, I decided to uninstall and reinstall it.

That’s when things got interesting.

I’d installed WordPress using a simple WordPress utility page offered by my ISP, so I went there for the uninstall. On that screen, I was duly warned:

This tool can remove WordPress from your hosting account, or remove the installation from our records. These actions are not reversible!

[Uninstalling] will permanently delete this installation. This includes any files installed, as well as any database tables. Additional themes, plugins, modules, cache files, etc will be left behind.

I’d done enough uninstalls and reinstalls of various products to know that there was a good chance something would go wrong. So I carefully downloaded a copy of my blog site from the server to my hard drive. Then I uninstalled WordPress, reinstalled it, and checked my site. All my blog posts were completely gone.

No problem, right? After all, I’d suspected things wouldn’t go smoothly. So I went to my backup. Aha, there were the post folders, all neatly organized by month and year. I opened them up to start retrieving the lost posts—nothing. The folders were all completely empty.

At this point, I started to get concerned. How was it possible to have a complete backup of my site with no blog posts? Googling brought up an answer I definitely didn’t want: the actual text of my blog posts had been stored in a database table, which had been deleted along with my WordPress installation. Who knew?

Not me. Just to be clear, I have a pretty strong technical background. I’ve worked for IT organizations in various companies and managed web sites. But using WordPress was a new experience for me, and my assumption that content was stored in HTML files turned out to be false.

Fortunately, the story has a happy ending, as you can see from my blog (since almost all my old posts are back). Despite the warning that the uninstall was not reversible, I knew from experience that my ISP probably did have a backup of the database table. I contacted them and they were able to restore all but my last post, which had only existed for a few hours and wasn’t included in the timed backups. (Here’s a shoutout for the great help I received from Dot5hosting to get my blog restored!)

So there’s a lesson here, and it has to do with microcopy. I suspect that the average WordPress blogger is like I was and doesn’t realize blog posts are stored in a database table. That being the case, the following revised microcopy could help others avoid the fiasco I just experienced:

[Uninstalling] will permanently delete this installation. This includes any files you have installed; it also includes all content you have added, which is stored in MySQL database tables. (For instructions on backing up your database tables, click here.) Additional themes, plugins, modules, cache files, etc will be left behind.

There’s a feedback link on the WordPress utility page mentioned above. I think I’ll send them a link to this blog post. If it spares someone else the “adventure” I went through, that would be a good thing!