As Yogi Berra famously commented, “You can observe a lot just by watching.” Obvious? Sure. Easily ignored? That too, unless we make it a point to observe.

To illustrate with three of my favorite user experience examples:

Example 1

For the past few months, I’ve been enjoying an online course in Human-Computer Interaction offered by Coursera and taught by Stanford Associate Professor Scott Klemmer. In one session, he talked about Expedia’s experience with a problematic web page design. Their web analytics showed that a significant portion of users would click the Buy Now button, obviously intending to make a purchase, but then wouldn’t go through with it.

They were puzzled until they focused on the user experience. A confusing design led users to put their bank information in the wrong field—and then, of course, the transaction failed. Once the problem was fixed, Expedia calculated that they realized an additional $12 million in profit that year.

Example 2

With identify theft prevalent in cyberspace, password security is getting a lot of attention. You’ve probably been to sites that measure the strength of your password as you’re setting up a new account. You’d think that would be motivating to most people… but Associate Professor Anthony Vance of BYU conducted research that showed it wasn’t; in fact, it had no more effect on password strength than static text.

So what does motivate users to create stronger passwords? Paying attention to user behavior revealed this interesting insight: the most effective motivator was an interactive interface that evaluates the password and shows roughly how long it would take a hacker to crack. (The research is described here. Professor Vance’s findings were presented at an IT conference I attended and to my knowledge haven’t been published online.)

Example 3

Paul Howe and his colleagues came up with what they thought was a really cool idea: allow people making online purchases to tell their friends via social media. So they created a realistic mockup and did user testing. Were they ever glad they did: most of their users hated it. So after minimal time and expenditure they abandoned the idea.

Several of their competitors had the same idea, which they apparently developed without actually testing with users. Some months and a boatload of money later, they also conceded that it wasn’t such a good idea after all. Paul determined that their user testing probably saved them 9 months of work and around $2 million.

In each of these examples, paying attention to users revealed behavior that was surprising to the designers, and which they wouldn’t have known about otherwise. Yogi Berra was right—you can observe a lot just by watching! The trick is actually doing it.